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Daffodils on Kingbear Lane

 

4 April 2014 – The images in this pdf file (1.4 mb) were taken of Kingbear Lane and show the variety of daffodils which flower along the lane. The daffodils had been planted some time previously by Jenny Doney who was then a resident on Botternell Farm, at the foot of the lane.

 

From Venning’s Postal Directory of 1901

The Blizzard in the West

This book is a record and story of the disastrous storm which raged throughout Devon and Cornwall, and West Somerset, on the night of March 9th, 1891. The whole book can be seen here.

The report on the storm is fascinating. The impact on the Launceston / Liskeard area is on pages 106 to 108. There are also some wonderful advertisements in there.

From “The House by the Stream”

“The squire of Trebartha Hall became concerned about the tenant farmer up on the moor at Colquite. On a bright morning when the sun shone again on a brilliant expanse of white, the trees laden with glittering snow and some broken down under the weight, he asked Harry [Landrey], then a stalwart young gamekeeper, to endeavour to make his way up the steep moor road then over the moor track to the farm. Harry related that he trudged up the moor road without undue difficulty, packed as it was with snow, to the tops of the boundary walls. But as he floundered through the deep snow on top of the moor he could see nothing the farm which lay under the hill. This hill was a landmark; he struggled up to it, and below he saw a single chimney-top sticking out of an enormous snow drift. Slithering down, Harry shouted down the chimney, ‘Are you alright?’ The farmer’s strong voice replied ‘Is that you Harry? – yes we’re all doing fine, only we can’t open the door or windows, we’re proper snowed up’. ‘And how about food?’ ‘Oh, we’ve got bacon, flour and groceries to last for another week, we won’t starve and we’re nice and warm’. Harry said the thaw came forty eight hours later and the farm emerged once more from its snow cocoon. But the losses in stock were terrible, and for years the moors were littered with skeletons of cattle and sheep”.

1894 Floods in Middlewood and Bathpool

 

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